MN History Center

345 W. Kellogg Blvd.
St. Paul, MN 55102
Directions

Museum Hours

Tue 10 am-8 pm
Wed-Sat 10 am-5 pm
Sun Noon-5 pm 
Closed Monday (Open Monday holidays year round)
Museum Holiday Hours

Library Hours

Tue 9 am-8 pm
Wed-Sat 9 am-4 pm
Closed Sunday and Monday
Library Holiday Hours

Admission

Contact

651-259-3000
Contact

2016 Jul 22

 

History Forum

2016-17 History Forum

Box Office Policies:

• Purchase tickets online or by phone at 651-259-3015
• Series subscription: $84 public ($66 MNHS members)
• Individual tickets: $16 public ($13 MNHS members)
• Reservations are required and will be confirmed when payment is received.
• All other confirmation materials will be sent via regular mail.
• Museum admission charged separately.
• No refunds will be given.

 

The Ghost of Tecumseh

    Saturday, October 22, 2016 - 10:00am

$16 ($13 MNHS members) 

Join historian Adam Jortner of Auburn University for a discussion on Shawnee military commander Tecumseh. In 1806, Tecumseh and his brother, the Shawnee religious leader Tenskwatawa, founded the city of Prophetstown in Indiana as an American Indian bulwark against U.S. invasion. There, they warned that unbelievers "would see darkness come over the sun." Future president William Henry Harrison, then-governor of Indiana Territory, scoffed at the prophecy until a solar eclipse brought hundreds of dispossessed American Indians to Prophetstown to stand with Tecumseh. Jortner will argue that the 1811 battle at Prophetstown brought the U.S. to the brink of defeat, rewriting American history and challenging the idea of Manifest Destiny.

To purchase related book in advance: The Gods of Prophetstown
Also available through Hennepin and Ramsey County Libraries
 

The Ghost of Tecumseh

    Saturday, October 22, 2016 - 2:00pm

$16 ($13 MNHS members) 

Join historian Adam Jortner of Auburn University for a discussion on Shawnee military commander Tecumseh. In 1806, Tecumseh and his brother, the Shawnee religious leader Tenskwatawa, founded the city of Prophetstown in Indiana as an American Indian bulwark against U.S. invasion. There, they warned that unbelievers "would see darkness come over the sun." Future president William Henry Harrison, then-governor of Indiana Territory, scoffed at the prophecy until a solar eclipse brought hundreds of dispossessed American Indians to Prophetstown to stand with Tecumseh. Jortner will argue that the 1811 battle at Prophetstown brought the U.S. to the brink of defeat, rewriting American history and challenging the idea of Manifest Destiny.

To purchase related book in advance: The Gods of Prophetstown
Also available through Hennepin and Ramsey County Libraries
 

FDR's Four Freedoms

    Saturday, November 19, 2016 - 10:00am

$16 ($13 MNHS members) 

Join historian Jeffrey Engel as he discusses FDR's legacy of freedom for the United States. The specter of global war loomed large in President Roosevelt's mind as he prepared his 1941 State of the Union address. His rallying cry to the nation framed the United States' role in the conflict, and ultimately its role in forging the post-war world to come as a fight for four freedoms--freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom from fear and freedom from want--ideas that informed decades of American political debate and that continue to shape the way we view the world today.

To purchase related book in advance: The Four Freedoms


FDR's Four Freedoms

    Saturday, November 19, 2016 - 2:00pm

$16 ($13 MNHS members) 

Join historian Jeffrey Engel as he discusses FDR's legacy of freedom for the United States. The specter of global war loomed large in President Roosevelt's mind as he prepared his 1941 State of the Union address. His rallying cry to the nation framed the United States' role in the conflict, and ultimately its role in forging the post-war world to come as a fight for four freedoms--freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom from fear and freedom from want--ideas that informed decades of American political debate and that continue to shape the way we view the world today.

To purchase related book in advance: The Four Freedoms


Andrew Carnegie and the Gospel of Wealth

    Saturday, December 3, 2016 - 10:00am

$16 ($13 MNHS members) 

Join author David Nasaw as he presents on the many faces of Andrew Carnegie, a tycoon, unashamed of the fortune he amassed by now-illegal means. Carnegie was also an energetic advocate for world peace and a merciless strike-breaker. He was a public-spirited philanthropist who warned fellow millionaires that they would die "unwept, unhonored and unsung" if they didn't used their fortunes for the benefit of society. Both a hard-nosed capitalist and a benevolent civic patron, Carnegie left a complicated imprint on our ideas about wealth and public responsibility.

To purchase related book in advance: Andrew Carnegie.
Also available through Hennepin and Ramsey County Libraries

Andrew Carnegie and the Gospel of Wealth

    Saturday, December 3, 2016 - 2:00pm

$16 ($13 MNHS members) 

Join author David Nasaw as he presents on the many faces of Andrew Carnegie, a tycoon, unashamed of the fortune he amassed by now-illegal means. Carnegie was also an energetic advocate for world peace and a merciless strike-breaker. He was a public-spirited philanthropist who warned fellow millionaires that they would die "unwept, unhonored and unsung" if they didn't used their fortunes for the benefit of society. Both a hard-nosed capitalist and a benevolent civic patron, Carnegie left a complicated imprint on our ideas about wealth and public responsibility.

To purchase related book in advance: Andrew Carnegie.
Also available through Hennepin and Ramsey County Libraries

Nat Turner's Revolt

    Saturday, January 21, 2017 - 10:00am

$16 ($13 MNHS members) 

Join historian Patrick Breen as he discusses Nat Turner's revolt. On the evening of August 21, 1831, Nat Turner launched his famous rebellion against slaveholders in Virginia. The revolt was quickly subdued, but Turner's name became a byword for terror throughout the South. Several dozen enslaved people joined Turner, though most did not, either out of fear or because they disagreed with him. Many whites called for retribution while others feared that vengeance would do more damage than good. The divergent opinions they held and the choices they made illuminate the complex human experiences often overshadowed by American concepts of race.

To purchase related book in advance: The Land Shall Be Deluged in Blood: A New History of the Nat Turner Revolt.

Also available through Hennepin County Libraries.


Nat Turner's Revolt

    Saturday, January 21, 2017 - 2:00pm

$16 ($13 MNHS members) 

Join historian Patrick Breen as he discusses Nat Turner's revolt. On the evening of August 21, 1831, Nat Turner launched his famous rebellion against slaveholders in Virginia. The revolt was quickly subdued, but Turner's name became a byword for terror throughout the South. Several dozen enslaved people joined Turner, though most did not, either out of fear or because they disagreed with him. Many whites called for retribution while others feared that vengeance would do more damage than good. The divergent opinions they held and the choices they made illuminate the complex human experiences often overshadowed by American concepts of race.

To purchase related book in advance: The Land Shall Be Deluged in Blood: A New History of the Nat Turner Revolt.

Also available through Hennepin County Libraries.


The U.S.-Mexico Border

    Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 10:00am

$16 ($13 MNHS members) 

Join historian Rachel St. John as she discusses the history of the U.S.-Mexico border. In 1848, the U.S. and Mexico drew a line through an undistinguished strip of land on the map of North America and called it the border. Over the next 70 years, the two nations developed various arrangements that made it a flexible barrier that restricted the movement of some without impeding others. By the 1930s, government officials, American Indians, investors, workers and immigrants had begun to transform this line in the sand into an increasingly regulated boundary, one that defines U.S. sovereignty today.

To purchase related book in advance: Line in the Sand: A History of the Western U.S.-Mexico Border.

Also available through Hennepin County Libraries.


The U.S.-Mexico Border

    Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 2:00pm

$16 ($13 MNHS members) 

Join historian Rachel St. John as she discusses the history of the U.S.-Mexico border. In 1848, the U.S. and Mexico drew a line through an undistinguished strip of land on the map of North America and called it the border. Over the next 70 years, the two nations developed various arrangements that made it a flexible barrier that restricted the movement of some without impeding others. By the 1930s, government officials, American Indians, investors, workers and immigrants had begun to transform this line in the sand into an increasingly regulated boundary, one that defines U.S. sovereignty today.

To purchase related book in advance: Line in the Sand: A History of the Western U.S.-Mexico Border.

Also available through Hennepin County Libraries.


The Rise of the Modern Right

    Saturday, March 18, 2017 - 10:00am

$16 ($13 MNHS members) 

Join Harvard University historian Lisa McGirr as she discusses the rise of the modern right. In the early 1960s, American conservatives seemed to have fallen on hard times. McCarthyism was on the run. The political left was grabbing headlines, and mainstream America was snickering at the political right. But a quiet grassroots campaign was underway. Thousands of suburban pioneers were working to shift the conservative movement from discredited clusters of extremists to respectability and dominant party status that eventually led to the presidential election of Ronald Reagan and to ongoing debates and divisions in American politics in the 21st century.

To purchase related book in advance: Suburban Warriors: The Origins of the New American Right.

Also available through Hennepin County Libraries.


The Rise of the Modern Right

    Saturday, March 18, 2017 - 2:00pm

$16 ($13 MNHS members) 

Join Harvard University historian Lisa McGirr as she discusses the rise of the modern right. In the early 1960s, American conservatives seemed to have fallen on hard times. McCarthyism was on the run. The political left was grabbing headlines, and mainstream America was snickering at the political right. But a quiet grassroots campaign was underway. Thousands of suburban pioneers were working to shift the conservative movement from discredited clusters of extremists to respectability and dominant party status that eventually led to the presidential election of Ronald Reagan and to ongoing debates and divisions in American politics in the 21st century.

To purchase related book in advance: Suburban Warriors: The Origins of the New American Right.

Also available through Hennepin County Libraries.