MN History Center

345 W. Kellogg Blvd.
St. Paul, MN 55102
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Museum

Tue 10 am-8 pm 
Wed-Sat 10 am-5 pm
Sun Noon-5 pm 
Closed Monday (Open 10 am-5 pm Monday holidays year round)
Museum Holiday Hours

Exhibit Pricing

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Library

Tue 9 am-8 pm
Wed-Sat 9 am-4 pm
Closed Sunday and Monday
Library Holiday Hours

Free Admission

Contact

651-259-3000
Contact

2017 Nov 16

 

History Forum

2017-18 History Forum

Box Office Policies:

• Purchase tickets online or by phone at 651-259-3015
• Series subscription: $84 public ($66 MNHS members) 
• Individual tickets: $16 public ($14 MNHS members) - available at the links below
• Reservations are required and will be confirmed when payment is received.
• All other confirmation materials will be sent via regular mail.
• Museum admission charged separately.
• No refunds will be given.

 

The Immigration Problem, 1917 & 2017

    Saturday, December 2, 2017 - 10:00am
 
During the large-scale immigration of the early 20th century, many Americans feared that the foreign-born would steal jobs, lower wages, and threaten American morality and culture. After a national commission issued a study that implied certain types of immigrants might weaken the "American race," Congress passed the Immigration and Nationality Acts of 1917 and 1924, two of the most restrictive immigration policies in U.S. history. Join historian Katherine Benton-Cohen as she discusses how this policy established a framework for modern immigration policy that has never been entirely dismantled.
 
Katherine Benton-Cohen is associate professor of history at Georgetown University and author of "Borderline Americans: Racial Division and Labor War in the Arizona Borderlands."

The Immigration Problem, 1917 & 2017

    Saturday, December 2, 2017 - 2:00pm
 
During the large-scale immigration of the early 20th century, many Americans feared that the foreign-born would steal jobs, lower wages, and threaten American morality and culture. After a national commission issued a study that implied certain types of immigrants might weaken the "American race," Congress passed the Immigration and Nationality Acts of 1917 and 1924, two of the most restrictive immigration policies in U.S. history. Join historian Katherine Benton-Cohen as she discusses how this policy established a framework for modern immigration policy that has never been entirely dismantled.
 
Katherine Benton-Cohen is associate professor of history at Georgetown University and author of "Borderline Americans: Racial Division and Labor War in the Arizona Borderlands."

Women's Rights & Modern America

    Saturday, January 20, 2018 - 10:00am
 
Forty years ago, two women's movements drew a line in the sand between liberals and conservatives. At the 1977 National Women’s Conference in Houston—referred to by Gloria Steinem as "the most important event nobody knows about"—liberal feminists endorsed abortion rights, the ERA, and gay rights. Across town, Phyllis Schlafly and conservative women rallied to launch the Pro-Family movement. Join historian Marjorie Spruill as she discusses the legacy of the rift between these two women’s movements and how it is still evident today in American politics.
 
Marjorie Spruill is professor of history at the University of South Carolina and author of "New Women of the New South: The Leaders of the Woman Suffrage Movement in the Southern States."

Women's Rights & Modern America

    Saturday, January 20, 2018 - 2:00pm
 
Forty years ago, two women's movements drew a line in the sand between liberals and conservatives. At the 1977 National Women’s Conference in Houston—referred to by Gloria Steinem as "the most important event nobody knows about"—liberal feminists endorsed abortion rights, the ERA, and gay rights. Across town, Phyllis Schlafly and conservative women rallied to launch the Pro-Family movement. Join historian Marjorie Spruill as she discusses the legacy of the rift between these two women’s movements and how it is still evident today in American politics.
 
Marjorie Spruill is professor of history at the University of South Carolina and author of "New Women of the New South: The Leaders of the Woman Suffrage Movement in the Southern States."

LBJ, Nixon & the Making of Today's Supreme Court

    Saturday, February 24, 2018 - 10:00am
 
The Warren Court of the 1950s and 1960s was the most liberal Supreme Court in American history. Yet within a few short years, new appointments shifted the court in a more conservative direction. Historian Laura Kalman will explore the court's shift and the fierce ideological battles of the late 1960s and early 1970s that reframed the Warren Court’s work in a negative light. She will also examine how the events of the 1960s and 1970s still impact the U.S. Supreme Court today.
 
Laura Kalman is a history professor at the University of California-Santa Barbara and author of "The Long Reach of the Sixties: LBJ, Nixon, and the Making of the Contemporary Supreme Court."

LBJ, Nixon & the Making of Today's Supreme Court

    Saturday, February 24, 2018 - 2:00pm
 
The Warren Court of the 1950s and 1960s was the most liberal Supreme Court in American history. Yet within a few short years, new appointments shifted the court in a more conservative direction. Historian Laura Kalman will explore the court's shift and the fierce ideological battles of the late 1960s and early 1970s that reframed the Warren Court’s work in a negative light. She will also examine how the events of the 1960s and 1970s still impact the U.S. Supreme Court today.
 
Laura Kalman is a history professor at the University of California-Santa Barbara and author of "The Long Reach of the Sixties: LBJ, Nixon, and the Making of the Contemporary Supreme Court."

Sweet Land of Liberty

    Saturday, March 24, 2018 - 10:00am
 
Most histories of the civil rights movement focus on places like Birmingham, Selma, and Montgomery. But battles were also fought on the streets of Pittsburgh, Detroit, Boston and Minneapolis-St. Paul, where many whites believed that the absence of explicit segregation implied the absence of racial inequality. Join historian Thomas Sugrue as he explores the stories of Northern activists who challenge racial crises above the Mason-Dixon Line.
 
Thomas Sugrue is a professor at New York University and author of "Sweet Land of Liberty: The Forgotten Struggle for Civil Rights in the North."

Sweet Land of Liberty

    Saturday, March 24, 2018 - 2:00pm
 
Most histories of the civil rights movement focus on places like Birmingham, Selma, and Montgomery. But battles were also fought on the streets of Pittsburgh, Detroit, Boston and Minneapolis-St. Paul, where many whites believed that the absence of explicit segregation implied the absence of racial inequality. Join historian Thomas Sugrue as he explores the stories of Northern activists who challenge racial crises above the Mason-Dixon Line.
 
Thomas Sugrue is a professor at New York University and author of "Sweet Land of Liberty: The Forgotten Struggle for Civil Rights in the North."