MN History Center

345 W. Kellogg Blvd.
St. Paul, MN 55102
Directions

Museum Hours

Tue 10 am-8 pm
Wed-Sat 10 am-5 pm
Sun Noon-5 pm 
Closed Monday (Open Monday holidays year round, including 2/15).
Museum Holiday Hours

Library Hours

Tue 9 am-8 pm
Wed-Sat 9 am-4 pm
Closed Sunday and Monday
Library Holiday Hours

Admission

  • $12 adults
  • $10 seniors and college students w/ID
  • $10 active military w/ID
  • $6 children ages 5-17
  • Free Tuesdays 5-8 pm
  • Free for children age 4 and under and MNHS members
  • Free to visit the library
     

Contact

651-259-3000
Contact

2016 Feb 10

 

History Forum

History Forum 2015-16: American Encounters

Box Office Policies:

• Purchase tickets online or by phone at 651-259-3015
• Series subscription: $82 public ($60 MNHS members)
• Individual tickets: $15 public ($11 MNHS members)
• Reservations are required and will be confirmed when payment is received.
• All other confirmation materials will be sent via regular mail.
• Museum admission charged separately.
• No refunds will be given.

 

The Colorado Coalfield Wars

    Saturday, February 20, 2016 - 10:00am
 
With Thomas Andrews
 
On a spring morning in 1914, in the stark foothills of southern Colorado, members of the United Mine Workers of America clashed with guards employed by the Rockefeller family, and a state militia beholden to Colorado’s industrial barons. When the dust settled, nineteen men, women, and children among the miners’ families lay dead. The strikers had killed at least thirty men, destroyed six mines, and laid waste to two company towns. Their deadly contest left an impact on the land, on labor, on corporate industrialization, and created a legacy for on an economy dependent on fossil fuel.
 
Thomas G. Andrews is an associate professor of history at the University of Colorado-Boulder and the author of the prize-winning Killing for Coal: America's Deadliest Labor War.
 

The Colorado Coalfield Wars

    Saturday, February 20, 2016 - 2:00pm
 
With Thomas Andrews
 
On a spring morning in 1914, in the stark foothills of southern Colorado, members of the United Mine Workers of America clashed with guards employed by the Rockefeller family, and a state militia beholden to Colorado’s industrial barons. When the dust settled, nineteen men, women, and children among the miners’ families lay dead. The strikers had killed at least thirty men, destroyed six mines, and laid waste to two company towns. Their deadly contest left an impact on the land, on labor, on corporate industrialization, and created a legacy for on an economy dependent on fossil fuel.
 
Thomas G. Andrews is an associate professor of history at the University of Colorado-Boulder and the author of the prize-winning Killing for Coal: America's Deadliest Labor War.
 

The Case of Dr. Ossian Sweet

    Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 10:00am
 
With Kevin Boyle
 
Ossian Sweet, a proud African American doctor—grandson of a slave—climbed from the ghetto to a home of his own in a previously all-white neighborhood in Detroit. Just after his arrival, a mob gathered outside his house; suddenly, shots rang out: Sweet, or one of his defenders, had accidentally killed one of the whites threatening their lives and homes. What followed was an infamous murder trial that drew America’s greatest attorney, Clarence Darrow, into the fray and transformed Sweet into a controversial symbol of racial equality, class and justice in a changing nation.
 
Kevin Boyle teaches history at Northwestern University and is the author of Arc of Justice: A Saga of Race, Civil Rights and Murder in the Jazz Age, which received the 2004 National Book Award for nonfiction.
 

The Case of Dr. Ossian Sweet

    Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 2:00pm
 
With Kevin Boyle
 
Ossian Sweet, a proud African American doctor—grandson of a slave—climbed from the ghetto to a home of his own in a previously all-white neighborhood in Detroit. Just after his arrival, a mob gathered outside his house; suddenly, shots rang out: Sweet, or one of his defenders, had accidentally killed one of the whites threatening their lives and homes. What followed was an infamous murder trial that drew America’s greatest attorney, Clarence Darrow, into the fray and transformed Sweet into a controversial symbol of racial equality, class and justice in a changing nation.
 
Kevin Boyle teaches history at Northwestern University and is the author of Arc of Justice: A Saga of Race, Civil Rights and Murder in the Jazz Age, which received the 2004 National Book Award for nonfiction.