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MN History Center

345 W. Kellogg Blvd.
St. Paul, MN 55102
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Museum Hours

Tue 10 am-8 pm
Wed-Sat 10 am-5 pm
Sun Noon-5 pm 
Closed Monday (Open Monday holidays year round)
Museum Holiday Hours

Library Hours

Tue 9 am-8 pm
Wed-Sat 9 am-4 pm
Closed Sunday and Monday
Library Holiday Hours

Admission

  • $11 adults
  • $9 seniors and college students w/ID
  • $9 active military w/ID
  • $6 children ages 6-17
  • Free Tuesdays 5-8 pm
  • Free for children age 5 and under and MNHS members
  • Free to visit the library
     

Contact

651-259-3000
Contact

2015 Jul 27

 

History Forum

History Forum 2015-16: American Encounters

Box Office Policies:

• Purchase tickets online or by phone at 651-259-3015
• Series subscription: $82 public ($60 MNHS members)
• Individual tickets: $15 public ($11 MNHS members)
• Reservations are required and will be confirmed when payment is received.
• All other confirmation materials will be sent via regular mail.
• Museum admission charged separately.
• No refunds will be given.

 

The Louisiana Purchase

    Saturday, October 3, 2015 - 10:00am
 
With Jon Kukla
 
The Louisiana Purchase doubled the size of the U.S and set in motion visions of Manifest Destiny; it dramatically reshaped European influence in North America and helped preserve a tentative Union while establishing it as a territorially rich land. It was also brought about by men—Thomas Jefferson, Charles Talleyrand, James Monroe and Napoleon Bonaparte—who had never seen the Mississippi Valley, who would strive to overcome the controversy that surrounded America’s aspirations to empire.
 
Jon Kukla is a recognized authority on seventeenth- and eighteenth-century American history and the author of A Wilderness So Immense: The Louisiana Purchase and the Destiny of America.
 
 

The Louisiana Purchase

    Saturday, October 3, 2015 - 2:00pm
 
With Jon Kukla
 
The Louisiana Purchase doubled the size of the U.S and set in motion visions of Manifest Destiny; it dramatically reshaped European influence in North America and helped preserve a tentative Union while establishing it as a territorially rich land. It was also brought about by men—Thomas Jefferson, Charles Talleyrand, James Monroe and Napoleon Bonaparte—who had never seen the Mississippi Valley, who would strive to overcome the controversy that surrounded America’s aspirations to empire.
 
Jon Kukla is a recognized authority on seventeenth- and eighteenth-century American history and the author of A Wilderness So Immense: The Louisiana Purchase and the Destiny of America.

The Transcontinental Railroad

    Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 10:00am
 
With Richard White
 
The transcontinental railroads of the late nineteenth century were the first corporate behemoths. Their attempts to generate profits from debt sparked devastating panics in the U.S. economy. Their dependence on public largess drew them into the corridors of power, creating new forms of corruption. Their operations rearranged space and time, and remade the landscape of the West. As wheel and rail, car and coal, they opened new worlds of work and ways of life. They also gave birth to the modern economy Americans live within the 21st century.
 
Richard White is a Pulitzer-Prize nominated historian and author of the award-winning Railroaded: The Trans-continentals and the Making of Modern America.
 

The Transcontinental Railroad

    Saturday, November 21, 2015 - 2:00pm
 
With Richard White
 
The transcontinental railroads of the late nineteenth century were the first corporate behemoths. Their attempts to generate profits from debt sparked devastating panics in the U.S. economy. Their dependence on public largess drew them into the corridors of power, creating new forms of corruption. Their operations rearranged space and time, and remade the landscape of the West. As wheel and rail, car and coal, they opened new worlds of work and ways of life. They also gave birth to the modern economy Americans live within the 21st century.
 
Richard White is a Pulitzer-Prize nominated historian and author of the award-winning Railroaded: The Trans-continentals and the Making of Modern America.
 

The Scopes Trial

    Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 10:00am
 
With Edward Larson
 
In the summer of 1925, the sleepy hamlet of Dayton, TN, became the setting for one of the 20th century’s most contentious dramas: the Scopes trial that pitted anti-Darwinists against evolutionists in a famous debate over science, religion, and public education. The movie Inherit the Wind paint a romantic picture of John Scopes as a principled biology teacher driven to present scientific theory to his students, even in the teeth of a Tennessee state law prohibiting the teaching of anything other than creationism. The truth, it turns out, was something quite different, and its legacy still echoes in American classrooms today.
 
Ed Larson holds the Hugh and Hazel Darling Chair in Law and is University Professor of History at Pepperdine University and author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Summer for the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America's Continuing Debate Over Science and Religion.

The Scopes Trial

    Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 2:00pm
 
With Edward Larson
 
In the summer of 1925, the sleepy hamlet of Dayton, TN, became the setting for one of the 20th century’s most contentious dramas: the Scopes trial that pitted anti-Darwinists against evolutionists in a famous debate over science, religion, and public education. The movie Inherit the Wind paint a romantic picture of John Scopes as a principled biology teacher driven to present scientific theory to his students, even in the teeth of a Tennessee state law prohibiting the teaching of anything other than creationism. The truth, it turns out, was something quite different, and its legacy still echoes in American classrooms today.
 
Ed Larson holds the Hugh and Hazel Darling Chair in Law and is University Professor of History at Pepperdine University and author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Summer for the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America's Continuing Debate Over Science and Religion.

The U.S. Occupation of the Philippines

    Saturday, January 23, 2016 - 10:00am
 
With Susan K. Harris
 
When the U.S. liberated the Philippines from Spanish rule in 1898, the exploit was hailed at home as a great moral victory, Uncle Sam’s triumph over tyranny. The next move, however, was hotly contested: should the U.S. annex the land it had freed?  The antagonists agreed on one point: that the United States was divinely appointed to bring democracy—and white Protestant culture—to the rest of the world. They eventually decided that America should act as "God's arbiters" in a globalizing world and gave rise to current debates on topics ranging from evangelical politics and American exceptionalism.
 
Susan K. Harris is the Joyce and Elizabeth Hall Distinguished Professor of American Literature and Culture at The Univerversity of Kansas.
 

The U.S. Occupation of the Philippines

    Saturday, January 23, 2016 - 2:00pm
 
With Susan K. Harris
 
When the U.S. liberated the Philippines from Spanish rule in 1898, the exploit was hailed at home as a great moral victory, Uncle Sam’s triumph over tyranny. The next move, however, was hotly contested: should the U.S. annex the land it had freed?  The antagonists agreed on one point: that the United States was divinely appointed to bring democracy—and white Protestant culture—to the rest of the world. They eventually decided that America should act as "God's arbiters" in a globalizing world and gave rise to current debates on topics ranging from evangelical politics and American exceptionalism.
 
Susan K. Harris is the Joyce and Elizabeth Hall Distinguished Professor of American Literature and Culture at The Univerversity of Kansas.
 

The Colorado Coalfield Wars

    Saturday, February 20, 2016 - 10:00am
 
With Thomas Andrews
 
On a spring morning in 1914, in the stark foothills of southern Colorado, members of the United Mine Workers of America clashed with guards employed by the Rockefeller family, and a state militia beholden to Colorado’s industrial barons. When the dust settled, nineteen men, women, and children among the miners’ families lay dead. The strikers had killed at least thirty men, destroyed six mines, and laid waste to two company towns. Their deadly contest left an impact on the land, on labor, on corporate industrialization, and created a legacy for on an economy dependent on fossil fuel.
 
Thomas G. Andrews is an associate professor of history at the University of Colorado-Boulder and the author of the prize-winning Killing for Coal: America's Deadliest Labor War.
 

The Colorado Coalfield Wars

    Saturday, February 20, 2016 - 2:00pm
 
With Thomas Andrews
 
On a spring morning in 1914, in the stark foothills of southern Colorado, members of the United Mine Workers of America clashed with guards employed by the Rockefeller family, and a state militia beholden to Colorado’s industrial barons. When the dust settled, nineteen men, women, and children among the miners’ families lay dead. The strikers had killed at least thirty men, destroyed six mines, and laid waste to two company towns. Their deadly contest left an impact on the land, on labor, on corporate industrialization, and created a legacy for on an economy dependent on fossil fuel.
 
Thomas G. Andrews is an associate professor of history at the University of Colorado-Boulder and the author of the prize-winning Killing for Coal: America's Deadliest Labor War.
 

The Case of Dr. Ossian Sweet

    Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 10:00am
 
With Kevin Boyle
 
Ossian Sweet, a proud African American doctor—grandson of a slave—climbed from the ghetto to a home of his own in a previously all-white neighborhood in Detroit. Just after his arrival, a mob gathered outside his house; suddenly, shots rang out: Sweet, or one of his defenders, had accidentally killed one of the whites threatening their lives and homes. What followed was an infamous murder trial that drew America’s greatest attorney, Clarence Darrow, into the fray and transformed Sweet into a controversial symbol of racial equality, class and justice in a changing nation.
 
Kevin Boyle teaches history at Northwestern University and is the author of Arc of Justice: A Saga of Race, Civil Rights and Murder in the Jazz Age, which received the 2004 National Book Award for nonfiction.
 

The Case of Dr. Ossian Sweet

    Saturday, March 12, 2016 - 2:00pm
 
With Kevin Boyle
 
Ossian Sweet, a proud African American doctor—grandson of a slave—climbed from the ghetto to a home of his own in a previously all-white neighborhood in Detroit. Just after his arrival, a mob gathered outside his house; suddenly, shots rang out: Sweet, or one of his defenders, had accidentally killed one of the whites threatening their lives and homes. What followed was an infamous murder trial that drew America’s greatest attorney, Clarence Darrow, into the fray and transformed Sweet into a controversial symbol of racial equality, class and justice in a changing nation.
 
Kevin Boyle teaches history at Northwestern University and is the author of Arc of Justice: A Saga of Race, Civil Rights and Murder in the Jazz Age, which received the 2004 National Book Award for nonfiction.