Minnesota Historical Society M-Flame Logo

MN History Center

345 W. Kellogg Blvd.
St. Paul, MN 55102
Directions

Museum Hours

Tue 10 am-8 pm
Wed-Sat 10 am-5 pm
Sun Noon-5 pm
Closed Monday (Open Monday Holidays, including Dec. 29, 10 am-5 pm.)
Museum Holiday Hours

Library Hours

Tue 9 am-8 pm
Wed-Sat 9 am-4 pm
Closed Sunday and Monday
Library Holiday Hours

Admission

  • $11 adults
  • $9 seniors and college students w/ID
  • $9 active military w/ID
  • $6 children ages 6-17
  • Free Tuesdays 5-8 pm
  • Free for children age 5 and under and MNHS members.
  • Free to visit the library
     

Contact

651-259-3000
Contact

2014 Dec 18

12°
Overcast | Wind Calm
updated: 2:09 wunderground.com
 

History Forum

History Forum 2014-15: No Matter of Chance

“Destiny is no matter of chance. It is a matter of choice ” – William Jennings Bryan

Explore six historical moments when the United States faced choices that would shape its destiny—choices between cooperation and independence, democracy and republic, isolation and involvement, power and justice, darkness or light.

Tickets available online and by phone at 651-259-3015. 

   Box Office Policies:

• Series subscription: $82 public ($60 MHS members)
• Individual tickets: $15 public ($11 MHS members)
• Reservations are required and will be confirmed when payment is received.
• All other confirmation materials will be sent via regular mail.
• Museum admission charged separately.
• No refunds will be given.

These programs are made possible by the Arts & Cultural Heritage Fund through the vote of Minnesotans on November 4, 2008. Support for this program has been provided by the Charles A. Lindbergh fund.

 

The Cold Warrior

    Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 10:00am
$15 ($11 MNHS Members)
Purchase tickets online or by phone at 651-259-3015.
 
with Robert McMahon, Ohio State University
 
As leader of the U.S.’s fight against the global threat of Soviet Communism, President Dwight D. Eisenhower aimed to contain the Cold War without perverting democracy, either at home or abroad.  He kept the United States out of any “hot” wars, but authorized covert actions that laid the foundations for future military entanglements in Vietnam, Iran and Iraq. He supported the nation through its greatest economic boom, but failed to address its civil rights crisis.  Robert McMahon explores the ramifications of Ike’s Cold War policies and their legacy for the United States.

The Cold Warrior

    Saturday, January 31, 2015 - 2:00pm
$15 ($11 MNHS Members)
Purchase tickets online or by phone at 651-259-3015.
 
with Robert McMahon, Ohio State University
 
As leader of the U.S.’s fight against the global threat of Soviet Communism, President Dwight D. Eisenhower aimed to contain the Cold War without perverting democracy, either at home or abroad.  He kept the United States out of any “hot” wars, but authorized covert actions that laid the foundations for future military entanglements in Vietnam, Iran and Iraq. He supported the nation through its greatest economic boom, but failed to address its civil rights crisis.  Robert McMahon explores the ramifications of Ike’s Cold War policies and their legacy for the United States.

The Age of Edison

    Saturday, February 14, 2015 - 10:00am
$15 ($11 MNHS Members)
Purchase tickets online or by phone at 651-259-3015.
 
with Ernest Freeberg, University of Tennessee
 
More than any other invention, Thomas Edison’s incandescent light bulb marked the arrival of modernity, banishing darkness with a light switch and forever changing the rhythms of daily life. To admirers, this “little globe of sunshine” was an enemy of urban crime, an engine of economic productivity, and a symbol of widespread prosperity. To critics, the light bulb seemed a dangerous creation with the power to end centuries of human habit. To most Americans, the humble light bulb signaled the emergence of the United States as “a nation of inventors” and a global force for change.

 


The Age of Edison

    Saturday, February 14, 2015 - 2:00pm
$15 ($11 MNHS Members)
Purchase tickets online or by phone at 651-259-3015.
 
with Ernest Freeberg, University of Tennessee
 
More than any other invention, Thomas Edison’s incandescent light bulb marked the arrival of modernity, banishing darkness with a light switch and forever changing the rhythms of daily life. To admirers, this “little globe of sunshine” was an enemy of urban crime, an engine of economic productivity, and a symbol of widespread prosperity. To critics, the light bulb seemed a dangerous creation with the power to end centuries of human habit. To most Americans, the humble light bulb signaled the emergence of the United States as “a nation of inventors” and a global force for change.

 


Wounded Knee: Party Politics and the Road to a Massacre

    Saturday, March 14, 2015 - 10:00am
$15 ($11 MNHS Members)
Purchase tickets online or by phone at 651-259-3015.
 
with Heather Cox Richardson, Boston University
 
On December 29, 1890, as Democrats and Republicans battled for political hegemony in Washington and for absolute control over a burgeoning America, a U.S. cavalry regiment hunted down and killed innocent Lakota men, women and children in the Wounded Knee Massacre. Heather Cox Richardson will reveal how a toxic mix of partisan politics, economics and rhetoric in Washington sparked the deadly events at Wounded Knee, and explore how the massacre illuminates the dangers of American political polarization, both in 1890 and today.

Wounded Knee: Party Politics and the Road to a Massacre

    Saturday, March 14, 2015 - 2:00pm
$15 ($11 MNHS Members)
Purchase tickets online or by phone at 651-259-3015.
 
with Heather Cox Richardson, Boston University
 
On December 29, 1890, as Democrats and Republicans battled for political hegemony in Washington and for absolute control over a burgeoning America, a U.S. cavalry regiment hunted down and killed innocent Lakota men, women and children in the Wounded Knee Massacre. Heather Cox Richardson will reveal how a toxic mix of partisan politics, economics and rhetoric in Washington sparked the deadly events at Wounded Knee, and explore how the massacre illuminates the dangers of American political polarization, both in 1890 and today.