MN History Center

345 W. Kellogg Blvd.
St. Paul, MN 55102

Museum Hours

Tue 10 am-8 pm
Wed-Sat 10 am-5 pm
Sun Noon-5 pm 
Closed Monday (Open Monday holidays year round)
Museum Holiday Hours

Library Hours

Tue 9 am-8 pm
Wed-Sat 9 am-4 pm
Closed Sunday and Monday
Library Holiday Hours




2016 Oct 26


History Lounge

Lounge with us!

Join local historians, authors and experts for evening conversations about the history that shapes Minnesota and its people.

• Select Tuesday nights at 7 p.m. October through May
• Free; no reservations needed
• Enjoy dessert, snacks, beer and wine available from Café Minnesota during the program.



The History Lounge is made possible by the Charles A. Lindbergh Fund and the support of the Arts, Culture and Heritage Fund.


Upcoming History Lounge Events

Forgotten Plague: TB in Minnesota

    Tuesday, November 15, 2016 - 7:00pm
In the 1920s and 1930s, Minnesota had more tuberculosis beds per capita than any other state. Join historian Mary Krugerurd as she explores the disease's forgotten history in Minnesota. Contrary to myths about sanatoriums being places to die, the majority of Minnesota's patients went on to live long and productive lives. However, significant stigma existed around TB, and many former patients never talked about their treatment, not even to their families.

Capital City Architecture - Pioneer-Endicott

    Tuesday, December 13, 2016 - 7:00pm

When the Pioneer Press Building opened its doors in 1889, the 12-story skyscraper merited a 40-page special edition of the Pioneer Press, and the editors proclaimed it "the greatest newspaper building mother earth carries." A year later the Endicott Complex, designed by Cass Gilbert to wrap around the Pioneer, opened its doors. Join architectural historian Larry Millett as he explores how these buildings have been at the heart of the city's rich human and architectural life.

The Ford Century in Minnesota

    Tuesday, January 24, 2017 - 7:00pm
The Ford Motor Company was a major industrial presence in the Twin Cities for nearly a century. The company’s experiments with every aspect of the industrial economy sent ripples and shockwaves through the lives of Minnesota workers, car dealers and buyers, families and communities. 
Explore the Ford Motor Company’s 100-year impact on the Twin Cities—from the Model T era to 2011, as viewed through the eyes of the workers who lived through the company’s industrial experiments, globalization, outsourcing the closure of the Twin Cities Assembly Plant. With historian Brian McMahon, author of The Ford Century in Minnesota.

The Origins of Black Civil Rights in Minnesota

    Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - 7:00pm

Frederick Douglass, confidant to the Great Emancipator and conscience of the Republican Party, delivered a rousing speech to a packed assembly in St. Paul, but, was denied a hotel room because he was black. This was Minnesota in 1873, four years after the state had approved black suffrage—a state where “freedom” meant being unshackled from slavery but not social restrictions, where “equality” meant access to the ballot but not to a restaurant downtown. Discover how, in a state where racial prejudice and oppression wore a liberal mask, black settlers and entrepreneurs, politicians, and activists maneuvered within a restricted political arena to bring about real and lasting change. With Dr. Bill Green, author of Degrees of Freedom: The Origins of Civil Rights in Minnesota, 1865–1912 

Citizens United-The Non Partisan League

    Tuesday, March 21, 2017 - 7:00pm

In 1915, western farmers mounted one of the most significant challenges to party politics America has seen: the Nonpartisan League, which sought to empower citizens and restrain corporate influence. Before its collapse in the 1920s, the League counted over 250,000 paying members, and inspired the creation of the Minnesota DFL. Yet today it is all but forgotten, neglected even by scholars. Explore the history and legacy of the League with historian Michael J. Lansing, author of Insurgent Democracy: The Nonpartisan League in North American Politics.

Alice in France - The WWI Letters of Alice O'Brien

    Tuesday, April 11, 2017 - 7:00pm

In March 1918, twenty-six-year-old Alice O’Brien of St. Paul set off for wartime France. As the daughter of a wealthy family, Alice had no need to work—no need to go to war. But she, like hundreds of American women, traveled “over there” to serve as an auxiliary nurse, a canteen worker and ambulance driver—experiences she described in breezy, but telling letters home from the front lines. With author and historian Nancy O’Brien Wagner.